Sourdough Rye Bread


I know, I know, it was supposed to be Sourdough Cinnamon Rolls today, but after letting them sit all night, I discovered upon reading the recipe further (should have done that before, right?) that after I added the rest of the ingredients they have to proof for 8-12 hours, THEN I roll them out THEN they go in the fridge overnight.  Whew!  So I will be eating the rolls TOMORROW!  I will post about them next week. =)

But let me tell you about the rye!  I had my son, Biologist, make them while I made the rolls.  He did such an amazing job!  It came out of the oven just before lunch today and WOW!  I had forgotten that I like rye bread.  In fact, I REALLY like it!  Some of the younger ones didn’t so much, so I told them it was for adult taste buds.  Ha!  Don’t like?  No problem! =)

Anyway, here is the recipe from Breadtopia:

On Rye: Higher in protein, phosphorus, iron and potassium than wheat. It’s high in lysine, low in gluten and very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Zinc, Copper and Selenium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber and Manganese.

Rye bread, including pumpernickel, is a widely eaten food in Northern and Eastern Europe. Rye is also used to make the familiar crisp bread.

Some other uses of rye include rye whiskey and use as an alternative medicine in a liquid form, known as rye extract. Often marketed as Oralmat, rye extract is a liquid obtained from rye and similar to that extracted from wheatgrass. Its benefits are said to include a strengthened immune system, increased energy levels and relief from allergies, but there is no clinical evidence for its efficacy. Rye also seems active in the prevention of prostate cancer.

Sourdough Rye Recipe:

Ingredients:
Water: 400 grams, 1 3/4 cups
Sourdough Starter: 70 grams, 1/3 cup (omit if making the instant yeast version)
Instant Yeast: 1 tsp. (omit if making sourdough leavened version)
Rye Flour: 245 grams, 1 3/4 cups
Bread Flour: 245 grams, 1 3/4 cups
Molasses: 44 grams, 2 Tbs.
Fennel Seed: 8 grams, 1 Tbs.(I have to say, after trying this, I would probably omit the fennel and anise and use more caraway, but that’s just me.  Not bad, just doesnt seem like true rye…)
Anise Seed: 2 grams, 1 tsp.
Caraway Seed: 3 grams,  1 tsp.
Salt: 12 grams, 1 3/4 tsp.
Zest of 1 Orange (We also didn’t add this.  Didn’t have it on hand, and the idea didn’t appeal to me)

For sourdough version:

In a mixing bowl, mix the starter into the water. Add the molasses, all the seeds and orange zest.

In a separate bowl, combine the flours and salt.

Gradually stir the dry ingredients into the wet using a dough whisk or spoon until the flour is well incorporated. Cover with plastic and let rest for 15 minutes. After about 15 minutes, mix again for a minute or two. Again let rest for 15 minutes and mix one more time as before. Now cover the bowl with plastic and let sit at room temperature for roughly 12-14 hours.

For instant yeast version:

The only difference is don’t use sourdough starter and instead mix the instant yeast into the dry ingredients before combining with the wet ingredients.

Note on 12-14 hour proofing period: I typically prepare everything in the evening for baking the next morning. You can also mix everything up in the morning and refrigerate until evening then remove before bed to resume the proofing at room temperature. Alternatively, if you get started with mixing everything up early enough in the morning, the bread can also be ready to bake in the evening. This is a nice option when you want fresh bread ready to eat for breakfast.

After the long 12-14 hour proof, stretch and fold the dough and shape into boule or batard (round or oblong) shape for baking. (If you didn’t follow that, I’m afraid you’re doomed to watch the video.) Cover again with plastic and let rest 15 minutes before putting in a proofing basket for the final rise. If you don’t have a proofing basket, line a bowl with a well floured kitchen towel and put the dough in there for the final rise. The final rise should last somewhere between 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Keep the dough covered with plastic to prevent it from drying out.

Preheat your oven to 475 F a half hour before baking.

Score the dough with a razor or sharp serrated knife and bake until the internal temp is about 200 F.

Let cool completely before eating.

And a couple of videos that show how to do it.  PART ONE

PART TWO

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